The 6 Most Adorable Animals You’ll See in the London Zoo

The London Zoo is home to a total of 21,743 animals of 843 different species (as of January 2016) so it’s not a surprise that you will find a lot of ridiculously cute and adorable animals when you visit. From penguins to monkeys to elephants, you will surely find one or two that will warm your heart and make you go “aww” the entire time.

Here are six of the most adorable animals you will see in the London Zoo.

Lemur

Lemurs are primates that can only be found on the island of Madagascar, and of course, in the London Zoo. The attraction where you can find these ring-tailed lemurs is specially designed to resemble Madagascar. The African island is home to many unique species of animals because of its isolation in Africa.

Lemurs can be distinguished by their long, striped, black-and-white tail, and use their hands and feet to travel from tree to tree. They have powerful scent glands which they use to communicate with other animals, as a weapon, and to mark their territories.

The African island is home to many unique species of animals because of its isolation in Africa. Lemurs can be distinguished by their long, striped, black-and-white tail, and use their hands and feet to travel from tree to tree. They have powerful scent glands which they use to communicate with other animals, as a weapon, and to mark their territories.

Burrowing Owlburrowing-owl-priceguidelady-co-uk

Burrowing owls are not your typical owl. Their natural habitat are burrows that have been dug out by other animals such as squirrels and prairie dogs. They are unmistakable as they are one of the smallest owls in North America, and have bright yellow eyes with distinctive white eyebrows. They are also more active during the day, unlike most owls. They bob their heads when excited or distressed.

Rockhopper Penguin

These are the world’s smallest penguins and are distinguished by the crest of spiky yellow and black feathers on their head. They are found on the shorelines of Antarctica, Chile, and New Zealand. And instead of waddling like other penguins, rockhoppers prefer bounding. Rockhoppers gather in colonies, often hundreds and thousands, during breeding times once a year.

Galapagos Giant Tortoise

Giant tortoises from the Galapagos islands are now listed as an endangered specie, as there now only 11 types of these tortoises remaining. They are the largest tortoises in the world, some measuring 5 feet in length and reaching 250 kilograms.

They are also the longest living vertebrates, living over 150 years on average. It is possible that one of the remaining giant tortoises on the island of Galapagos was merely a hatchling during Charles Darwin’s visit in 1835.

Black-Capped Squirrel Monkey

Also known as the Bolivian Squirrel Monkey or Peruvian Squirrel Monkey, black-capped squirrel monkeys are found in the rainforests of South America. They have the largest brains of all primates, with their brains comprising 4-5% of their total body weight. They have black-colored heads, hence the name “black-capped.”

Tamandua

The tamandua, or lesser anteater, is much smaller than its relative, the giant anteater. It’s most active at night and likes to sleep during the day in hollow tree trunks or on the ground. Despite its poor vision due to its small eyes, they use their sense of hearing and of smell to sense danger and prey.

Drop by the London Zoo and meet these adorable animals and more.

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